Louis CK in GQ Louis CK in GQ

The Milk Carton Kids, Live from Lincoln Theatre

[Sources] would very often say the most incredible things to me because [since I was a woman] they weren’t concentrating on the fact that I was concentrating on them.

I probably scored a number of scoops that way. It’s just hilarious. One time I was doing a story about junkets on Capitol Hill. I think Northwest [Airlines] had inaugurated a new line to Japan and Korea. They had taken on their maiden voyage most of the members of the Senate Commerce Committee, which of course controlled regulation of the airline industry.

So I did a bunch of interviews with people who went, and then I asked the people who didn’t go why they didn’t. I remember [Montana Democrat] Mike Mansfield said something of great integrity. He just said, “Don’t do that kind of thing.” But there was a senator, [New Hampshire Republican] Norris Cotton, who said, “Oriental food gives me the trots.” And that was the subhead in the story! It was just too good.
President Obama reads Where the Wild Things Are to kids at the White House Easter Egg Roll. 
Glad that he’s made this reading (and animated faces!) an annual tradition.
(Photos by Saul Loeb) President Obama reads Where the Wild Things Are to kids at the White House Easter Egg Roll. 
Glad that he’s made this reading (and animated faces!) an annual tradition.
(Photos by Saul Loeb) President Obama reads Where the Wild Things Are to kids at the White House Easter Egg Roll. 
Glad that he’s made this reading (and animated faces!) an annual tradition.
(Photos by Saul Loeb)

President Obama reads Where the Wild Things Are to kids at the White House Easter Egg Roll. 

Glad that he’s made this reading (and animated faces!) an annual tradition.

(Photos by Saul Loeb)

Christine Nairn’s free kick goal against FC Kansas City

Christine Nairn’s free kick goal against FC Kansas City

In 1973, when General Pinochet overthrew Chile’s democratically elected Marxist president, Salvador Allende, who committed suicide, Mr. García Márquez vowed never to write as long as General Pinochet remained in power.

The Pinochet dictatorship lasted 17 years, but Mr. García Márquez released himself from his vow well before it ended. ‘I never thought he’d last so long,’ he said in a 1997 interview with The Washington Post. ‘Time convinced me I was wrong. What I was doing was allowing Pinochet to stop me from writing, which means I had submitted to voluntary censorship.’

"Gabriel García Márquez, Conjurer of Literary Magic, Dies at 87" / NY Times

I love this picture of him working in his Mexico City home in 1962

1964 New York World’s Fair

(NYT has some other features on the fair)

Heart-shaped Harbor Island, Maine

(Photo by Chris Pinchbeck)